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Philosophy (PHIL Courses)

PHIL 101 Survey of Philosophy

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
C-ID Course Number: PHIL 100
Course Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An overview of the central issues and movements in philosophy. Topics to be selected from such areas as ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics (the study of reality), epistemology (the study of knowledge), logic, aesthetics, phenomenology and existentialism.

PHIL 102 Existence and Reality

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction to the problems of metaphysics (the study of reality and existence) and epistemology (the study of knowledge). Possible topics include the existence of God, freedom versus determinism, the mind/body problem, problems of knowledge, appearance versus reality, and existentialism.

PHIL 105 Ethics

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
C-ID Course Number: PHIL 120
Course Offered: Spring, Summer
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction into the nature of ethics examining ethical issues, traditional and nontraditional ethical systems, and various contemporary ethical problems such as abortion and euthanasia.

PHIL 112 Logic

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
C-ID Course Number: PHIL 110
Course Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction to the methods of principles of logic exploring inductive logic, deductive logic, and critical thinking including applications to philosophy, the exact sciences, the social sciences, and to reasoning in everyday life.

PHIL 114 Critical Thinking

3.0 units.
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 - Freshman Composition: Exposition
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
Introduction to critical thinking and critical writing. The student will learn techniques of practical reasoning and argumentation, with emphasis on application of these techniques in the writing of a sequence of argumentative essays. Topics include: critical reading, argument analysis, recognizing propaganda and stereotypes, clarifying ambiguity, meaning and definition, evaluation evidence, logical correctness versus factual correctness, and common mistakes in reasoning (formal and informal fallacies). Critical writing strategies are emphasized. Sample arguments for analysis are drawn from readings in philosophy and from culturally diverse sources in other fields. This course has been designed to fulfill the IGETC Critical Thinking/English Composition requirement.

PHIL 121 Religions of the Modern World

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
Course Offered: Fall, Spring
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction to the religious philosophy, beliefs and practices of six major world religions, including brief historical and cultural background on each. Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity will be studied.

PHIL 122 Exploring Religious Issues

3.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer to UC, CSU
Grading Method: Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
An exploration of the basic issues involved in the philosophy of religion. Topics covered include the existence of God, the nature of God, the nature of evil, life after death, and the methodology required to find answers to these issues. A variety of approaches and viewpoints will be considered. (F1)

PHIL 189 Independent Projects

0.0 units.
Acceptable for credit: Transfer CSU
Grading Method: Letter Grade Only
Courses for students capable of independent work who demonstrate the need or desire for additional study beyond the regular curriculum. Enrollment allows students to pursue activities such as directed field experience, research, or development of skills and competencies under faculty advisement and supervision. Independent projects may be earned in most disciplines. Students wishing to enroll in Independent Projects should contact the appropriate instructor identified in the class schedule. If the project proposed is acceptable to that instructor, a contract will be developed. All contracts for these classes must be completed and submitted to the Records Office no later than the end of the second week of the semester. Students may enroll for any combination (unit value) of Independent Projects 189 and/or 389 for a total of four semesters in a specific discipline. Units are awarded depending upon satisfactory performance and the amount of time committed by the student to the course. Allowable units vary according to discipline, and are based on the following formula: 1 unit - 48 hours per semester 2 units - 96 hours per semester 3 units - 144 hours per semester